CENTER FOR DEMOCRACY AND RECONCILIATION IN SOUTHEAST EUROPE

JHP Phase I - Teacher Training and Outreach

The JHP covers 12 countries in Southeast Europe, with contributors, editors, translators, coordinators and supervisors from all of the countries. In addition, the materials contain documents drawn from diverse sources in all of the countries.

The JHP also works with teachers' groups on advocacy with both local and central authorities and in these ways, helps to empower teachers as potential agents of change and to participate in a democratic system themselves.

For 2011-2013, we are working on further dissemination of the well-established four history books in seven languages to educators in Southeast Europe. About 7200 copies were already disseminated and 7700 are planned to be distributed during the next three years, including a new Montenegrin language edition, a 3rd Serbian edition, a 2nd Albanian edition and a 2nd Bosnian edition. Also, 25 intensive training workshops will ultimately reach out to 2,040 new teachers in the Western Balkans via the workshops and dissemination of materials. An estimated total of 400,000 students will get access to the new materials and new learning methodologies.

Workshop Timeline
(click to extend)

Should you require further information, or have any queries about any of the country phases of the JHP, please contact us

If you are a teacher and would like to attend a training workshop, or would like further information, please contact us and we would be delighted to hear from you.

'the score of children who made up the classes represented a fair cross-section of the heterogenous population of Salonica. The [ ] group into which I was placed, was made up of three French boys, one Greek, four Spanish Jews, a Serb, a Mamin, an Armenian, a Turk and a Montenegrin boy. ... As we talked freely together [ ] we came to know of those things about one another's ways, which, viewed from the outside, might have appeared strange and meaningless.'

A boy describing his school experiences in Salonica in 1904 (Sciacky) From WB 4, The Second World War