CENTER FOR DEMOCRACY AND RECONCILIATION IN SOUTHEAST EUROPE

ACT students debate and create CDRSEE visibility plan

16March

ACT students debate and create CDRSEE visibility plan

March 2015 -- A group of students from the American College of Thessaloniki - ACT- brainstormed and worked together to come up with several unique plans to raise the visibility of the CDRSEE, as part of an ACT extra-curricular activity for students from a variety of majors who are interested in NGOs.

The CDRSEE took part in the case-study activity as part of its own marketing plan. The Center staff appreciated the youthful ideas, and was also happy to share their projects and goals in hopes of inspiring the students to work for democracy and human rights in any part of the world.

Three CDRSEE staff members and 20 ACT students came together for five hours to tackle the issue of CDRSEE's visibility in Thessaloniki.  In the past, the CDRSEE has maintained a low profile locally, while working and becoming well known abroad for its education and media projects. The goal is to play a more important role in the local community as well.

After a brief presentation about the organization and its ongoing projects, there was a lively discussion and analysis of the actual problem. The students were then divided in six groups and debated ideas and solutions.

They engaged in active dialogue -- a key to the CDRSEE's projects and programmes -- and came up with various inspiring ideas for raising the Center's visibility.

Finally, votes were placed and the three most-voted ideas were discussed further by the group as a whole and analysed as to how they could be practically implemented by the Center.

The case-study activity was an exciting opportunity to interact with students. The students were able to practice transforming abstract ideas into concrete actions, in a pleasant, encouraging atmosphere.

The American College of Thessaloniki (ACT) is the tertiary division of Anatolia College, an institution with a long and prestigious history that dates back to 1886.

  • Posted by admin1  Comments